Rocket Lawyer https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog Everyday Law Blog Sat, 04 Apr 2020 03:35:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4 Paycheck Protection Program Guide for Small Business Owners https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/payment-protection-program-ppp-guide-926383 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/payment-protection-program-ppp-guide-926383#respond Sat, 04 Apr 2020 03:11:24 +0000 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/?p=26383 HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESSES: THE $349 BILLION PAYCHECK PROTECTION PROGRAM  Small businesses experiencing hardship as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic have access to a number of financing options, including […]

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HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESSES: THE $349 BILLION PAYCHECK PROTECTION PROGRAM 

Small businesses experiencing hardship as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic have access to a number of financing options, including some new federal programs. The Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”), is one of the new financing options available from the U.S. government. Much of this information is based on a summary provided by the U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship.

To stay updated on these programs, please contact your local SBA District Office. If you need immediate loan assistance and can’t wait for the PPP to be rolled out, consider applying for an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL). The following is a summary of the Paycheck Protection Program, including eligibility requirements and application procedures. You can use this Coronavirus Government Relief Worksheet to determine if you may be eligible.


Coronavirus Government Relief Worksheet

Answer a few simple questions to find out what government relief could be available.


What is the Paycheck Protection program?

The Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), administered by the Small Business Administration (SBA), is meant to enable small businesses to keep employees on payroll during the COVID-19 crisis. With loans provided by participating lenders, the PPP includes generous forgiveness terms for businesses that meet the criteria, such as: 

  • 100% federally-guaranteed loans to employers who maintain their payroll during the emergency
  • Forgiveness of a portion of the loan (up to 8 weeks of “payroll costs” based on employee retention and salary levels) 
  • Deferment of principal and interest payments for the first six months of the loan (up to a maximum of a year) 
  • No SBA fees 

How to apply for the PPP

The SBA’s PPP page provides detailed information about the program and a search function to help you find a local lender. To get started, contact your local SBA District Office. Banks are scrambling to finalize their application process, with many banks accepting applications as of April 3. Applications will be accepted for loans under the PPP until June 30 of this year. 

Eligibility for PPP loans

The following types of U.S. business entities are eligible to apply for a PPP loan:

  • Small businesses in operation before February 15, 2020
  • Small businesses with fewer than 500 employees, certain nonprofits, veterans organizations, and tribal businesses (other size limits may apply, depending on the applicable size standard as provided by SBA)
  • Individuals who operate a sole proprietorship or independent contractor (and other eligible self-employed individuals)
  • Any business that employs not more than 500 employees per physical location and that is assigned an NAICS code beginning with 72, for which the affiliation rules are waived
  • Affiliation rules are also waived for any business operating as a franchise that is assigned a franchise identifier code by the SBA, and any company that receives funding through a Small Business Investment Company (affiliation rules are complicated, so if they could apply to your business, you may want to ask a lawyer for advice) 

Loan size limits

Depending on the needs of your business, the loan size will be calculated in different ways, subject to the maximum loan size of $10 million. Certain timelines also apply, including:

  • If you were in business February 15, 2019 – June 30, 2019: Your max loan is equal to 250% of your average monthly payroll costs during that time period (if your business employs seasonal workers, you can opt to choose March 1, 2019, as your time period start date)
  • If you were not in business between February 15, 2019 – June 30, 2019: Your max loan is equal to 250% of your average monthly payroll costs between January 1, 2020 and February 29, 2020
  • If you took out an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) between February 15, 2020, and June 30, 2020 and you want to refinance that loan into a PPP loan, you would add the outstanding loan amount to the payroll sum

What costs can be counted as payroll costs?

  • Compensation (salary, wage, commission, or similar compensation, payment of cash tip or equivalent), subject to the $100,000 per-employee limit discussed below
  • Payment for vacation, parental, family, medical, or sick leave
  • Allowance for dismissal or separation
  • Payment required for the provisions of group health care benefits, including insurance premiums
  • Payment of any retirement benefit
  • Payment of state or local tax assessed on the compensation of employees

What costs cannot be counted as payroll costs?

  • Compensation over $100,000 per employee
  • Taxes imposed or withheld under chapters 21, 22, and 24 of the IRS code
  • Compensation of employees who reside outside of the United States
  • Qualified sick and family leave for which a credit is allowed under sections 7001 and 7003 of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

How can loan proceeds be used?

  • Payroll costs (as described above)
  • Costs of group health care benefits during periods of paid sick, medical, or family leave, and insurance premiums
  • Employee salaries, commissions, or similar compensation (subject to limitations as described above)
  • Payments of interest on any mortgage obligation (but not any payment or prepayment of principal)
  • Rent (including rent under a lease agreement)
  • Utilities
  • Interest on any other debt obligations that were incurred before the covered period

Loan term, interest rate and fees

  • Maximum term is 10 years
  • Maximum interest rate is 4 percent
  • Zero loan fees
  • Zero prepayment fee 
  • SBA will establish application fee caps for lenders that charge application fees

What is loan forgiveness, and how is it calculated?

Borrowers can apply for forgiveness on PPP loans up to the sum of the following costs incurred during the 8-week period after the loan is made. Forgiven loan amounts are not taxed as income. 

  • Payroll costs (excluding compensation over $100,000) 
  • Payment of interest on any covered mortgage obligation (not including any prepayment or payment of principal)  
  • Payment on any covered rent obligation  
  • Covered utility payments

What if a small business reduces pay or cuts staff? Does this affect loan forgiveness? 

The amount of the PPP loan that is eligible for forgiveness may be reduced if the borrower reduces pay by more than 25 percent for employees earning less than $100,000 per year or cuts its staff during the relevant period. These rules around loan forgiveness are complex and a full summary is beyond the scope of this article. Small business owners would be well-advised to ask an attorney for assistance in reviewing loan documents and understanding loan forgiveness provisions before executing the loan documents. 

How do I get forgiveness on my PPP loan?

You must apply through your lender for forgiveness on your loan and provide:

  • Documentation verifying the number of employees on payroll and pay rates, including IRS payroll tax filings and state income, payroll, and unemployment insurance filings
  • Documentation verifying payments on covered mortgage obligations, lease obligations, and utilities
  • Certification from an authorized representative of your business that the documentation provided is true and the amount being forgiven was used in accordance with the PPP’s requirements for use

What happens after the forgiveness period?

Any loan amounts not forgiven are carried forward as an ongoing loan with maximum terms of 10 years, at a maximum interest rate of 4 percent. Principal and interest will continue to be deferred for a total of six months to one year after disbursement of the loan. The clock does not start again.

Ask a lawyer

If you have questions about government relief or need legal help due to the coronavirus pandemic, Rocket Lawyer is here for you. Get free legal advice and essential documents to safeguard your business in our Coronavirus Legal Center. You can also contact the Rocket Lawyer CARES support team toll-free at (877) 885-0088, Monday through Friday, from 6am – 6pm PST.

This article contains general legal information and does not contain legal advice. Rocket Lawyer is not a law firm or a substitute for an attorney or law firm. The law is complex and changes often. For legal advice, please ask a lawyer.

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Economic Injury Disaster Loan Guide for Small Business Owners https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/economic-injury-disaster-loan-eidl-926389 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/economic-injury-disaster-loan-eidl-926389#respond Sat, 04 Apr 2020 03:11:17 +0000 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/?p=26389 HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESSES: ECONOMIC INJURY DISASTER LOAN PROGRAM  There is a wide variety of financing options available for small businesses that have been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. […]

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HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESSES: ECONOMIC INJURY DISASTER LOAN PROGRAM 

There is a wide variety of financing options available for small businesses that have been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program is one of the new financing options available from the U.S. federal government, providing loans of up to $2 million. The following information is drawn primarily from a summary provided by the U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship.

If you are interested in larger financing options, the $349 billion Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) was created pursuant to the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”) enacted on March 27, 2020. You can use this Coronavirus Government Relief Worksheet to determine if you may be eligible.


Coronavirus Government Relief Worksheet

Answer a few simple questions to find out what government relief could be available.


Components of the Economic Injury Disaster Loan program

Loan advance: up to $10,000

Small business owners can apply for an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) advance of up to $10,000. The advance is meant to provide economic relief to businesses that are experiencing a temporary loss of revenue due to the health crisis. Funds will be made available quickly and do not have to be repaid. The advance may be used to keep employees on the payroll, pay for sick leave, meet increased production costs due to supply chain disruptions, or pay business obligations (including debts, rent, and mortgage payments). 

Any small business located in the United States can apply for the advance. You must first apply for an EIDL before you may request the advance. 

Bridge loans: up to $25,000

Small business owners who have an existing relationship with an SBA Express Lender can use the Express Bridge Loan Pilot Program to access up to $25,000 with reduced paperwork. These loans are designed to quickly help small businesses overcome the temporary loss of revenue caused by the health crisis. The Express Bridge Loan can be used to bridge the gap while waiting for a decision on (and disbursement of) an EIDL. Express Bridge Loans can be repaid in full or in part by proceeds from an EIDL. 

Economic Injury Disaster Loan: up to $2,000,000

EIDLs are lower-interest loans of up to $2 million—with the principal and interest deferred at the SBA’s discretion—that are available to pay for expenses that could have been met had the disaster not occurred, including payroll and other operating expenses. You can apply online for a disaster loan related to COVID-19. 

EIDL eligibility

Small businesses with 500 or fewer employees that fall into one of the following categories are eligible for an EIDL:

  • Sole proprietorships, with or without employees
  • Independent contractors
  • Cooperatives and employee-owned businesses
  • Tribal small businesses
  • Small business concerns and small agricultural cooperatives that meet the applicable size standard for SBA are also eligible (you will need your 6-digit NAICS Code and your 3-year average annual revenue), and most private non-profits of any size 

How to apply 

EIDLs are currently available from SBA lenders. You can apply for an EIDL online or contact your local SBA District Office when applying for SBA assistance. You can also find an SBA lender near you at SBA’s website. For questions about SBA disaster loans, contact the SBA disaster assistance customer service center at 1-800-659-2955 (TTY: 1-800-877-8339) or e-mail at disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.

Ask a lawyer

If you are unsure about how to access government assistance or need legal help due to the coronavirus crisis, we’re here to help. Get free legal advice and access key documents for protecting your business in our Coronavirus Legal Center. You can also reach the Rocket Lawyer CARES support team toll-free at (877) 885-0088, Monday through Friday, from 6am – 6pm PST.

This article contains general legal information and does not contain legal advice. Rocket Lawyer is not a law firm or a substitute for an attorney or law firm. The law is complex and changes often. For legal advice, please ask a lawyer.

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A Message from Rocket Lawyer Founder, Charley Moore https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/a-message-from-our-founder-charley-moore-926283 Sat, 28 Mar 2020 19:35:48 +0000 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/?p=26283 If you’re like me, you didn’t know much about the novel coronavirus last summer. A few short months later, communities around the world fight the same hidden enemy: COVID-19. That […]

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If you’re like me, you didn’t know much about the novel coronavirus last summer. A few short months later, communities around the world fight the same hidden enemy: COVID-19. That enemy has endangered the health and livelihoods of billions of people, and wreaked havoc on businesses of every size—threatening the global economy. As such, this is perhaps the most, singularly and collectively, disruptive moment of our lifetimes.

Thank you to the caregivers, first responders, and military personnel who rush in to heal and to serve. Thank you to the truck drivers, store clerks, warehouse workers, and everyone else who is on the job, in harm’s way, during the crisis. And, if you, like me, are social distancing and sheltering in place—thank you, too, for doing your part to “flatten the curve.” Finally, if your business is suffering because it is closed or short on customers and sales, or you are personally suffering because you can’t work right now, I’m sorry—and read on, because we want to help. Through your sacrifice, you’re also helping to save lives and reduce the time until we defeat this thing, which we most certainly will.

At moments like this, I’m prouder than ever of our team at Rocket Lawyer. We’ve created a free Coronavirus Legal Center in partnership with attorneys in our network who also want to help. There, you can find a no-cost, one-stop resource for expert legal advice, business continuity guidance, critical legal documents, and consultations with lawyers to get you through the many challenges presented by our current global emergency. The Rocket Lawyer Coronavirus Legal Center is also an essential resource for legal advice in connection with government benefits, aid programs, and small business loans, pursuant to the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act. 

In keeping with our mission, which is always to make legal services affordable and simple, we’re trying to bring down the cost as much as we possibly can right now. So, we’re waiving fees for our coronavirus-related attorney Q&A feature, and we’re also making several key legal documents freely accessible, regardless of membership level. Lastly, if you need more help than what’s provided already, you can apply for additional assistance by emailing us at coronavirushelp@rocketlawyer.com.

Wishing you good health and a bright future. We will get through this together.

– Charley





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Answering employers’ questions about coronavirus https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/answering-employers-questions-about-coronavirus-926270 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/answering-employers-questions-about-coronavirus-926270#respond Fri, 27 Mar 2020 22:49:02 +0000 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/?p=26270 Charley Moore, Rocket Lawyer Founder and CEO answers common legal questions for employers in response to the COVID-19 pandemic for HR Executive. The questions address issues that could arise in […]

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Charley Moore, Rocket Lawyer Founder and CEO answers common legal questions for employers in response to the COVID-19 pandemic for HR Executive. The questions address issues that could arise in the workplace from FMLA to communication strategies as the pandemic unfolds.

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FMLA guidelines and paid sick leave legal answers for employers https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/fmla-guidelines-and-paid-sick-leave-for-employers-926245 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/fmla-guidelines-and-paid-sick-leave-for-employers-926245#respond Mon, 23 Mar 2020 15:41:25 +0000 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/?p=26245 Enacted in 1993, the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is designed to protect employees by helping them balance their work responsibilities with family obligations related to medical issues. If […]

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Enacted in 1993, the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is designed to protect employees by helping them balance their work responsibilities with family obligations related to medical issues. If you are an employer subject to the FMLA, it is important to understand your obligations and your employees’ rights under the law. 

In light of the coronavirus crisis, the federal government, along with some states and municipalities are taking additional emergency measures, including temporary changes to the law. For the latest advice specific to your business or employment practices, talk to a lawyer


Coronavirus Government Relief Worksheet

Answer a few simple questions to find out what government relief could be available.


What is FMLA?

Outside of public health emergencies, the FMLA requires covered employers to provide employees with up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave each year, and to guarantee that employer-sponsored group health benefits will be maintained during such leave. FMLA also protects employees by ensuring that taking covered time off will not affect their employment.

How has FMLA/paid leave law changed as a result of the coronavirus outbreak? 

On March 18, 2020, The Families First Coronavirus Response Act was made law. It grants the following protections: 

  • Two weeks of paid sick leave for employees ordered to quarantine by a doctor or by federal, state or local mandate. This leave can also be used by employees with COVID-19 symptoms who are seeking a diagnosis, or those caring for someone who is diagnosed. Self-imposed social distancing is not covered, if not ordered by law or a medical professional. That said, this leave does apply for parents who can’t work during their children’s school closures.
  • Public-health emergency FMLA leave for parents who are not able to go to work (or telecommute) if their minor child’s school is closed or their child care provider is not available due to a public health emergency related to COVID-19. In most cases this leave guarantees 12 weeks of job protection and is partially-paid after two weeks unpaid, however there are exceptions for small employers.

When it comes to emergency FMLA leave, nearly all employers with under 500 employees are required to comply, however small businesses with less than 50 employees may be able to claim an exemption if the requirement would create a financial hardship for the business. Further, small businesses with fewer than 25 employees may not have to guarantee job protection. Some health care workers and emergency response professionals are also excluded. 

On the other hand, all employers with fewer than 500 employees must temporarily offer emergency paid sick leave regardless of the employee’s tenure. These emergency measures take effect on April 1, 2020 and end on December 31, 2020. Employers must comply within 15 days of the law’s enactment. Tax credits will also be provided.

The guidelines for calculating payments and offering job protection are complex, so if you have questions about FMLA compliance as an employer, it is best to talk to a lawyer.

Am I required to pay employees who miss work due to illness?

In certain states and municipalities, employers must provide employees with paid sick leave. However, outside of the emergency COVID-19 guidelines outlined above, the FMLA normally only requires employers to give employees up to 12 weeks of unpaid time off without the risk of losing their job.

In some cases, employers can require employees to use their available sick time or vacation days to cover some or all of their FMLA leave. This is subject to the employer’s policies around paid time off. If your employees have accrued paid time off, the law allows them to use these hours as income protection during their time away from work.

PTO vs. sick time: What’s the difference?

Paid sick leave provides employees with time off work with pay for illnesses or injuries. In contrast, paid time off (PTO) policies give employees time off for any reason, including vacation, illness, or personal leave. Employers who offer PTO to employees generally don’t also offer separate sick time benefits, as PTO encompasses sick leave.

Employers trying to decide whether to offer separate vacation time and sick time vs. offering PTO may want to consider state law implications of both approaches. In some states, employers must pay terminating employees for any accrued but unused PTO or vacation time, but not sick time. Regardless of what you decide to offer, it can be helpful to document your time off/sick leave policy in an Employee Handbook.

Am I required to offer paid sick leave?

As of March 19, 2020, 13 states and the District of Columbia have laws in place requiring covered employers to provide paid sick leave for workers. If you have employees in Arizona, California, Connecticut, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, or the state of Washington, you should understand your state’s requirements. 

As a result of the coronavirus outbreak, you may be required to offer paid sick leave under federal law, as well. A local lawyer can explain which laws apply to your business.

How much sick time am I legally required to offer?

In addition to emergency federal regulations, if your state has enacted mandatory sick leave requirements for employers and your company meets the definition of a covered employer under state law, you should become familiar with your legal obligation. Minimum paid sick leave requirements vary from state to state.

In some states, employers must give workers at least one hour of paid sick time for every 30 hours worked; in other states, the requirement is one hour for every 35 or 40 hours worked. Vermont’s requirement is one hour of paid leave for every 52 hours worked and in the District of Columbia, employers with 1-24 employees must provide one hour for every 87 hours worked.

Talk to a lawyer

For employers of any size, it is critical to understand your obligations under the FMLA and state-specific laws regarding time off. An employment lawyer can help ensure that your company’s policies and procedures are designed to comply with all applicable requirements.

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FMLA, paid family leave & leave of absence legal answers for employees https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/fmla-paid-family-leave-leave-of-absence-for-employees-926247 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/fmla-paid-family-leave-leave-of-absence-for-employees-926247#respond Mon, 23 Mar 2020 15:40:44 +0000 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/?p=26247 Understanding your employer’s time off policies can be confusing. When can you use PTO or paid family leave? If a family member is sick, what options do you have for […]

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Understanding your employer’s time off policies can be confusing. When can you use PTO or paid family leave? If a family member is sick, what options do you have for taking time with income protection? Below, you will find several of the most frequently-asked questions and answers about time off policies for employees.

In light of the challenges that many families may face as a result of the coronavirus crisis, the federal government, alongside several states and municipalities are introducing emergency legislation, including temporary changes to employment law. For the latest advice specific to your situation, talk to a lawyer

What is FMLA?

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is a federal law that requires many businesses to give their workers time away from work when the employee or an immediate family member is ill, or for the pregnancy, birth, or adoption of the employee’s child. FMLA requires covered employers to give workers up to 12 weeks of time away from work, and ensures that employees will still have a job to come back to after their leave.

Unless a public health emergency is declared, FMLA does not require covered employers to provide paid time off, although your employer may require you to use some or all of your available sick time or PTO when you take an FMLA leave. FMLA provides for job protection, not income protection.

A “covered employer”, in non-emergency situations, is one that is a private business with at least 50 employees, a public or government agency, a public or private elementary or secondary school.

How has FMLA/paid leave law changed as a result of the coronavirus outbreak? 

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act was passed into law on March 18, 2020. It allows the following emergency protections: 

  • Two week of paid sick leave for employees ordered to quarantine, those who are seeking a COVID-19 diagnosis or are already diagnosed, and those caring for someone else who has been diagnosed. Self-quarantine that has not been ordered by a medical professional or by law is not included. That said, this paid leave does apply for parents who are unable to work during their child’s school closures.
  • Public-health emergency FMLA leave for parents who are not able to go to work (or telecommute) if their minor child’s school is closed or their child care provider is not available due to a public health emergency in relation to COVID-19. This leave is structured as two weeks of unpaid leave followed by ten weeks of partially-paid leave. 

In order to be eligible for emergency FMLA leave, an employee must have been employed for more than 30 days and their employer must have fewer than 500 employees. That said, some healthcare providers and emergency responders are not included, and small businesses with less than 50 employees may not have to comply if it would create financial hardship. If your employer has less than 25 employees, your FMLA leave may not be job-protected. 

On the contrary, all employers with fewer than 500 employees must offer emergency paid sick leave regardless of tenure. These emergency measures extend from April 1, 2020 to December 31, 2020. If you have any questions, an employment lawyer can help you understand your rights.

How do I apply for FMLA?

You are not automatically covered under FMLA. If the business you work for is a covered employer under the FMLA, your employer must post a conspicuous notice for employees providing information about how you can apply for leave/file a claim for leave under the Act. If your employer has provided an employee handbook, it may also include information about the company’s FMLA provisions, policies, and procedures.

In general, you should follow normal protocols for requesting time off and provide your employer with as much notice as possible about any time off requests, including leave under the FMLA. If you are not able to provide advance notice, notify your employer as soon as possible. You do not need to specifically state that you want to take FMLA leave, but you should give your employer enough information so they can recognize that the leave could be covered under FMLA. Within five days of your first leave request, your employer is required to notify you whether the time off is covered under FMLA. If the leave is not eligible, you will be told the reason the leave request does not meet the requirements.

How long does FMLA last?

Under the law, FMLA provides for up to 12 weeks away from work every calendar year. The 12 weeks of time off does not need to be consecutive. So, you could take it as needed in shorter increments. Your FMLA leave could also be used intermittently, such as working a reduced schedule.

What is Paid Family Leave?

In some states, including California, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and New York, certain employers are required to provide employees with paid family leave protections that go beyond the FMLA’s protections. This type of leave provides income protection during the employee’s or a covered family member’s serious illness, or for the birth or adoption of the employee’s child. This type of time-off benefit, if required in your state, generally operates as an insurance policy. The minimum length of paid time off varies from state to state, but in general, employees may get from 6 to 12 weeks of partial pay per year.

What is a leave of absence?

Your employer may also give you the option of taking a leave of absence. Personal leaves of absence are not mandated by the law and are up to each employer’s discretion. If your company has a leave of absence policy, they may require you to use up your vacation time or PTO before applying for an unpaid leave.

In contrast to the FMLA or Paid Family Leave laws, you do not need to have a covered reason to take a leave of absence if your employer allows you to do so. But, voluntary leaves of absence are also not guaranteed and do not offer job protection upon return from leave.

How is a leave different from sick days or PTO?

A voluntary leave of absence is not a guaranteed benefit. Your employer could choose to approve or deny your request for an extended period of time away from work. In addition, your leave is likely to be unpaid.

If your employer provides paid sick time or a PTO bank of days that you can use, you generally accrue hours each pay period which you can then use to take paid time off if you become ill (sick time or PTO) or want to take time off for any reason (PTO.)

Know your rights

Your specific rights to paid and unpaid time away from work depend on where you work, and the type and size of employer you work for. Contact your company’s HR representative if you have questions about your employer’s time off and leave policies. If you are concerned that your employer may not be adhering to the law, or if you want to understand your rights in a specific situation, ask a lawyer.


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Paid sick leave laws by state and recent federal legislation https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/paid-sick-leave-laws-by-state-and-recent-federal-legislation-926249 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/paid-sick-leave-laws-by-state-and-recent-federal-legislation-926249#respond Mon, 23 Mar 2020 15:39:34 +0000 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/?p=26249 As a result of the coronavirus crisis, the federal government, along with several states and municipalities are taking emergency legal actions, including making changes to the law. While a new […]

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As a result of the coronavirus crisis, the federal government, along with several states and municipalities are taking emergency legal actions, including making changes to the law. While a new federal law establishes emergency paid sick leave for qualifying employers from April 1 to December 31, 2020, several states have had their own guidelines for years. We’ve put together a guide to the states where such laws have been enacted.

As the news is unfolding rapidly, it is best to talk to a lawyer for the latest advice specific to your situation.

What states currently have paid sick leave laws?

As of March 20, 2020: California, Maryland and Washington state have statewide and local laws regarding paid sick leave. Arizona, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, Oregon, Rhode Island and Vermont offer statewide laws only. In response to the coronavirus pandemic, New York state has recently enacted a sick leave policy for those affected with coronavirus. Pennsylvania, Illinois, Minnesota, and Texas only offer sick leave policies in select cities, and also Washington D.C. has its own laws regarding paid sick leave. 

What are the laws in each state?

Arizona

  • Workers earn 1 hour of leave for every 30 hours worked. 
  • Employees begin accruing sick leave on hiring date or July 1, 2017, whichever is later. 
  • Employers with 15 or fewer employees must provide 24 hours of paid sick leave each year and those with more than 15 employees must provide 40 hours yearly.

California

  • Paid sick leave is required for employees who work 30 or more days within a year from the beginning of employment. 
  • All employees including part-time and temporary employees, earn one hour of paid leave for every 30 hours worked. Law applies to employers of all sizes.
  • Some cities in California, like San Francisco, have their own sick leave requirements.
  • Generally, employers must follow whichever law is more generous to workers.

Connecticut

  • Employers with over 50 employees must provide one hour of paid sick leave for every 40 hours worked by an hourly, nonexempt employee up to 40 hours yearly.
  • Connecticut sick leave law applies to part-time workers but not temporary workers.

Illinois

  • Illinois does not have a statewide sick leave policy, but certain cities and counties in the state offer their own policies.
  • In Chicago: 
    • Workers who work 80 hours within a 120 day period are covered by the city ordinance. 
    • Every 40 hours worked earns an hour of paid sick leave. 
    • Salaried employees who are exempt from overtime requirements accrue one hour per week of employment.  

Maine

  • Currently, Maine has no paid sick leave laws until the “Act Authorizing Earned Employee Leave” takes effect in 2021. 
  • The Act will require employers to allow employees to take time off for any reason, not limited to sick leave. 

Maryland

  • Employers with 15 or more employees may offer one hour of leave for every 30 hours worked or 40 hours at the start of the year. 
  • Employers with less than 14 employees must provide unpaid sick leave. 
  • This law is not applicable to workers who work less than 12 hours weekly, work in agriculture, or are defined as independent contractors. 
  • Some counties provide their own sick leave policies. 

Massachusetts

  • Employers with more than 10 employees have to provide one hour of leave for every 30 hours worked, with a cap of 40 hours. 
  • Employers with less than 10 employees must provide the option for unpaid sick leave. 
  • Under both scenarios, this time can be used if employees are ill, injured, or need time to attend to a condition for themselves or an immediate family member, including a parent. 

Michigan

  • Employees accrue one hour of sick leave for every 35 hours worked, with a maximum of 40 hours per year. 
  • Employers can provide all 40 hours at the beginning of the year to avoid carry-over.

Nevada

  • Employers with less than 50 employees do not have to provide sick leave. 
  • Employers with more than 50 employees must provide 40 hours of sick leave annually, however, if it is during the company’s first two years of operation they are not required to comply. 

New Jersey

  • Employees, including full- and part-time, earn one hour of sick leave for every 30 hours worked, capped at 40 hours. 
  • Employers can choose to make all 40 hours available at the beginning of the benefit year. 
  • The state’s sick leave law preempts any municipal laws regarding the topic.

New York

  • Two full weeks of paid sick leave are required for public and private sector workers who are forced into mandatory or cautionary quarantine due to coronavirus. 
  • In New York City:
    • Private sector employees of companies with 5 or more employees should by law earn up to 40 hours of paid sick time a year. 
    • Private sector employees in smaller companies should by law receive job protection for up to 40 hours of unpaid sick time a year. 
    • Employees begin earning sick time as soon as they are hired, but have to work for 120 days before they are able to use the time.

Oregon

  • Employers with 10 or more employees must provide 1 hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked, with a maximum of 40 hours. 
  • Employers with less than 10 employees must provide up to 40 hours of unpaid sick leave annually. 

Rhode Island

  • Employers with more than 18 employees must give workers (including full-time, part-time, seasonal, and temporary employees), paid sick leave.
  • For every 35 hours worked, one hour of leave is accrued. 
  • Employers with less than 18 employees must provide the same amount of leave, but it is unpaid. 

Vermont

  • Employees earn one hour of paid sick leave for every 52 hours worked, with an accrual cap is 40 hours. 
  • Exempt employees include federal employees, independent contractors, and temporary workers who work under 20 weeks. 

Washington

  • Employees earn one hour of paid sick leave for every 40 hours worked. 
  • This includes part-time and seasonal employees. 
  • If employees do not use all of their accrued hours, employers must carry over balances less than 40 hours. 

Washington D.C. 

  • In Washington D.C., paid sick leave time depends on the size of the employer. However, the law covers full-time and part-time employees. 
  • Employers with more than 100 employees must provide one hour of sick leave for every 37 hours worked, capped at 7 days annually. 
  • Businesses with 25-99 employees must provide one hour of leave for every 43 hours worked, capped at 5 days annually. 
  • Small employers who have less than 25 employees must provide one hour for every 87 hours worked, capped at 3 days annually. 

If you have questions about paid sick leave in your state, ask a lawyer

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Coronavirus emergency preparedness: 5 key legal documents https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/coronavirus-emergency-preparedness-legal-documents-926231 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/coronavirus-emergency-preparedness-legal-documents-926231#respond Mon, 16 Mar 2020 17:35:15 +0000 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/?p=26231 As communities mobilize to preserve public health in light of the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, you may have concerns about how to remain protected legally. Regardless of whether the virus has […]

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As communities mobilize to preserve public health in light of the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, you may have concerns about how to remain protected legally. Regardless of whether the virus has affected anyone in your local area, now is a good time to make sure that you have these critical legal documents in place, in the event that COVID-19 or any other unexpected illness impacts you or your loved ones.

What legal documents should I prepare during a global health emergency?

When a global health emergency hits home, many people are caught off guard because they don’t have the legal authority needed to step in and care for loved ones. Among the legal documents that may be needed are:


Protect your loved ones.

Outline your wishes in a Last Will and Testament.


Do I need a Last Will and Testament?

Every adult should have at least a basic Last Will and Testament in place at all times. When a global health emergency is looming, it should remind all of us to create a Will if we don’t have one or to review and revise an existing Will. Along with ensuring that your wishes will be honored after you are gone, a Will provides the only official opportunity you have to nominate a Guardian for your minor children in the event one is needed.

What is an Advance Directive?

An Advance Directive is a legal document that allows you to express your wishes regarding medical treatment to ensure those wishes are carried out should you be unable to communicate them to a doctor at a later date or that allows you to appoint an Agent to make healthcare decisions for you. Since state law governs advance directives, the type of advance directives that are recognized, the decisions that can be made, and the language required to make one may vary from state to state. Most states recognize at least two types of advance directives: a Healthcare Power of Attorney and a Living Will.

If you are a parent of adult children, consider getting these documents in place for your kids, especially if they live far away from home (as in college or studying abroad). As an Agent for your adult child, you will be able to get information from doctors and access medical records in order to make healthcare decisions if your child is unable to communicate or decide for themselves.

What is the difference between a Living Will and a Health Care Power of Attorney?

A Healthcare Power of Attorney allows you to designate someone as your “Agent” to make healthcare decisions for you if you are unable to make them yourself. Typically, your primary doctor must decide that you are unable to understand the nature and consequences of your medical decisions and/or that you are unable to make and communicate your decisions before your Agent’s authority activates.

A Living Will allows you to make your wishes known regarding the medical treatment you specifically wish to accept or reject. In some states, you can include detailed instructions that apply to a wide range of medical decisions that might need to be made on your behalf, including life-prolonging measures and treatment that is intended to relieve pain. Other states limit the decisions that can be made using a Living Will regarding life-sustaining treatments.  

What legal document can help me manage the care of my minor children?

If you are the parent of minor children, you undoubtedly worry about the possibility of an emergency occurring when they are in someone else’s care. This concern is heightened when there is a potential health crisis looming. For many parents in your position, a Child Care Authorization provides the perfect solution. A Child Care Authorization is a legal document that allows you to grant a caregiver the authority to do things such as pick up your children from school or consent to medical treatment for your minor children during the period of time they are with the caregiver. 

How should I manage the care of aging parents?

Millions of adult children provide unpaid care to aging parents in the United States. In light of the threat posed by the new coronavirus, you may be worried about your ability to manage your parents’ care. Of critical importance is ensuring that you have the legal authority to make health care, legal, and personal decisions for your parents if the need arises. If your parents have not already done so, they should execute a Healthcare Power of Attorney naming you as their Agent as well as a Living Will expressing their wishes regarding healthcare treatments and procedures. It may also be wise to have them execute a Durable General Power of Attorney naming you as their Agent so that you can manage their assets and finances if necessary. Making the Power of Attorney durable means that your authority as an Agent remains in effect even if your parent becomes incompetent or incapacitated.

If your parent has an illness such as dementia or Alzheimer’s, and they are already unable to make their own decisions, then they will not be able to name you as an Agent using a Power of Attorney. Instead, you will need to seek a court-appointed Conservatorship in order to be able to make decisions on their behalf.

Watching and waiting for a global health emergency such as the coronavirus to unfold can make you feel helpless. Making sure that you have the legal documents in place to protect yourself and your loved ones if that emergency comes to pass is a great way to take control of the situation and prevent that feeling of helplessness. If you have any questions about preparing your legal documents, ask a lawyer.

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Rental income tax guide for landlords https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/rental-income-tax-guide-for-landlords-926217 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/rental-income-tax-guide-for-landlords-926217#respond Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:58:32 +0000 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/?p=26217 Becoming a landlord presents incredible opportunities for stable passive income. However, it also presents new financial and legal obligations, including paying rental income tax. There are several nuances to taxation […]

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Becoming a landlord presents incredible opportunities for stable passive income. However, it also presents new financial and legal obligations, including paying rental income tax. There are several nuances to taxation of rental income, especially since there are differences between how the IRS treats real estate professionals renting out a property compared to those who simply receive supplemental income from rental activity.

Here is what you need to know:

Do I have to pay rental income tax?

Generally speaking, if you are making money from operating a rental property, yes, you need to report and pay taxes on your income. Rental activity creates taxable income in a majority of cases. The only exception to this rule is if you rent out your primary residence, such as renting out a bedroom on a homestay website for less than 15 days during the tax year. No income is required to be reported in that case.

However, if you rent out your primary residence for longer than 15 days or have a vacation or investment property, you must report and pay tax on the net rental income. In most cases, rental income is considered investment income and it doesn’t trigger self-employment tax like a “side hustle”. However, if you are a real estate professional or looking to make rental activity a full-time gig, you may need to pay self-employment tax in addition to income tax if you have not yet set up a corporation or LLC that may exempt you from this tax.

What types of expenses can I deduct as a landlord?

You can deduct expenses associated with rental activity if they are required to maintain the property, find a tenant, solve disputes, comply with the law, and other aspects of collecting rent and keeping your investment safe. The following items are deductible:

  • Advertising your rental through property listings, websites, and other methods
  • Legal and professional fees
  • Property management fees
  • Insurance
  • Mortgage interest and real estate taxes
  • HOA/condo board maintenance fees, if a condo property
  • Repair and maintenance labor
  • Purchase, installation, and maintenance of appliances and furniture
  • Supplies used to get the property in move-in condition
  • Legal and professional fees related to the lease or tenant disputes
  • Collection agency fees
  • State and local taxes on rental activity
  • Utilities

If the property is unoccupied and it takes longer to get a tenant than you anticipated, you cannot deduct the rent that you would have received. You only report the rent that you eventually do receive, but you can deduct the marketing expenses related to attempts to obtain tenants. You can also deduct the operating and maintenance expenses in the time that the property was vacant but available for rent.

If the property does not meet building codes or a complaint is filed against you and the state or city takes action, you cannot deduct any fines or penalties. Only fees paid to attorneys, accountants, and other compliance professionals are deductible, along with local taxes and the labor costs involved in maintaining and improving the property.

If my rental activity results in a loss, can I deduct it?

Most small landlords have a limit on the amount of rental loss that you are allowed to deduct. There are specific rules for losses from passive rental activity if you are not a full-time real estate professional such as a realtor or property manager.

Additionally, there are limits on your rental loss if you are renting out your primary residence (or put any other property to personal use).

Do landlords have to issue 1099 forms to contractors?

Form 1099-MISC is used to report payments made to contractors as part of business during the tax year. Payments can include fees for one-time services such as fixing a burst pipe to ongoing fees like lawn care or housekeeping for your rental units. If you paid the contractor more than $600, you may need to file a 1099-MISC. Generally speaking, if you made payments to corporations, paid using a payment processor like PayPal, or hired the contractor through a third-party platform, you do not have to file 1099s for those payments. If you have hired a property management company, the property manager may handle the 1099s for you, but it is important to confirm.

If you are unsure about filing a 1099, a tax lawyer or accountant can help.

What tax deadlines do I have as a landlord?

Your tax due dates will vary depending on your business structure. The IRS has published a calendar for tax deadlines, but generally speaking, here are a few dates to know for 2020:

January 31, 2020

  • Form 1099-MISC

March 16, 2020

  • Form 1065 (Multi-member LLC, LLP or partnership)
  • Form 1120-S (S-Corporation)

April 15, 2020

  • Form 1040 (Individual tax return, including income from a single-member LLC or unincorporated business)
  • Form 1120 (C-Corporation)

There may also be additional state and local deadlines for rental taxes, as well as self-employment taxes and quarterly estimated tax payments if you are a full-time self-employed real estate professional.  A CPA or accountant can help you determine all of the deadlines and forms that apply to your specific situation.

Navigating your taxes as a landlord can be difficult and time-consuming. If you have legal questions, connect with a tax attorney to get your rental activity on the right track!

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When to hire an accountant vs. when to use accounting software https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/when-to-hire-an-accountant-926208 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/when-to-hire-an-accountant-926208#respond Wed, 26 Feb 2020 00:49:23 +0000 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/?p=26208 Small business growth is great, but it does come with challenges. More revenue, profit, and investments in the future of your business lead to more complex accounting needs.  Although this […]

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Small business growth is great, but it does come with challenges. More revenue, profit, and investments in the future of your business lead to more complex accounting needs. 

Although this may seem intimidating, you can manage these changes as long as you have a solid accounting infrastructure. This leads to an important question, however: Should a professional accountant (such as a Certified Public Accountant, or CPA) handle your accounting needs, or can you get by with an accounting software solution?

Accountants—especially those that work in-house and full-time—cost way more than a subscription to an accounting software. They also offer a personalized, big picture approach that goes beyond number-crunching. You could handle your accounting needs yourself, but unless you have prior experience and can put in the time, your focus is better spent elsewhere. 

Ultimately, there are pros and cons to either hiring an accountant or subscribing to a software platform. The best option for your business depends on what you’re looking for at the moment. The accounting needs of a new business aren’t the same as those of a well-established startup. Read on to learn more. 

When to use accounting software

Accounting software is especially robust and accessible today. Most industry-leading tools have affordable plans for businesses of all sizes, and can handle a wide range of bookkeeping, accounting, and even tax-related tasks. In this way, accounting software is valuable as a budget-friendly, time-saving tool for managing your business finances.

Budgeting

Every business needs a comprehensive budget that accounts for multiple timeframes. Regardless of the size or the age of your business, it’s important to have a clear vision of how much money you have to spend, and how you’re likely to spend it each quarter and year.

Most accounting software has integrated budgeting that you can adjust as needed with your expected income and expenses. (For what it’s worth, accounting software itself usually costs a flat monthly fee—which makes it easier to budget for.)

The takeaway here is that budgeting is easy, adaptable, and predictable with accounting software. Working with an accountant may have variable fees depending on your needs.

Repetitive tasks

If you’re going to hire an accountant to simply process invoices, handle reimbursements, and keep track of your bank statements, your money could be better used towards paying for software. 

Software makes it easy to upload all of your financial documents and create reports, providing a secure backup of your records and automatically syncing all of your various accounts. (This, in turn, makes budgeting especially easy.) When everything is accessible, downloadable, and transferable, you’ll have a clearer view of your finances and you’ll be able to report them (to investors, lenders, partners, or others) when needed.

Similarly, accounting software automates invoicing clients, paying employees, and other repetitive tasks. With these tasks out of the way, you’ll avoid variable accountant fees and save yourself time.

When to hire an accountant

The primary reason to hire an accountant, on the other hand, is that you need a human touch. Larger companies and independent contractors with a variable income may both require a personalized approach. 

Financial planning

One of the best things an accountant can do for your business is create a custom financial plan. This goes beyond a budget and may include investment advice, portfolio diversification, and general business guidance. A great accountant is more like a personal advisor who gets to know you and your business, and can help you make smarter, more informed decisions.

If you have specific financial goals for the quarter or year, an accountant can help you reach them. They can help you allocate funds wisely to different parts of your business and reduce overlooked waste. No software can work with you to define responsible goals and develop a step-by-step plan to reach them.

This being said, accountants shouldn’t necessarily supersede software, as digitized books will help them gain insight into your business’s funds and create a plan. You may only need a lower-cost plan if an accountant will have access to the software.

Tax season

Tax season is time-consuming and complicated for everyone. Small business owners and independent contractors are no exception. Although you can use accounting or tax software to file your taxes, doing so is time-consuming. Plus, unless you have prior tax experience, you’re more likely to make costly mistakes. On the other hand, an accountant who knows your business will understand exactly what you need to file, which tax breaks are relevant to your business, and how to maximize your refund.

Additionally, when it comes to the IRS, you don’t want to take any chances. An accountant can help you mitigate the risks of a tax audit or getting penalized on your filing. By correctly preparing and submitting your tax documents, you can save money and free up capital for your business.

In the event that you are audited, an accountant can help you navigate the process. Many accountants offer audit insurance which covers the fees your business would normally be responsible for if you’re subjected to an audit. That means you won’t owe the accountant for the work they’ll put in to resolve the audit.

The bottom line

The time you spend managing your finances and keeping your books up to date is time you could be devoting to growing your business. Accounting software and accountants each offer innovative, time-saving solutions that ultimately increase your bottom line. However, there are pros and cons to each—as well as possible benefits and drawbacks to using both. It’s up to you to determine which option makes more sense for your business at any given time.

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AB-5 exemptions and opportunities: Should I form an LLC? https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/ab-5-exemptions-should-i-form-an-926192 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/ab-5-exemptions-should-i-form-an-926192#respond Thu, 13 Feb 2020 00:30:14 +0000 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/?p=26192 California’s new law, Assembly Bill 5 (AB-5), codified a state supreme court decision reclassifying what constitutes an independent contractor versus an employee. The intention behind the law is to stop […]

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California’s new law, Assembly Bill 5 (AB-5), codified a state supreme court decision reclassifying what constitutes an independent contractor versus an employee. The intention behind the law is to stop companies from taking advantage of gig economy workers, which is a class of at least 1 million people. While there are a few exemptions, the reclassification ensures that more people are eligible to receive a guaranteed hourly wage, overtime pay, and other labor protections. 

However, not every person who is affected by AB-5 thinks the new change is positive. Some industries, like trucking and media are unhappy with the changes that AB-5 brings. Freelance writers are upset with the new law because the bill limits content submissions to only 35 articles a year per publication. Truck drivers, on the other hand, have a temporary reprieve from AB-5 due to a court decision to place an injunction on AB-5 until the case is fully litigated, meaning the law does not take effect on truck drivers until the case makes it way through the court system.  


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AB-5 exemptions

In order to retain their independent contractor status and avoid losing income, some workers are forming LLC’s and establishing themselves as a separate business entity. In fact, the California secretary of state’s office reports that LLC registrations increased 5.71% from 2018 to 2019. AB-5 could be a factor in this increase as more contractors attempt to qualify for the business-to-business exemption. In addition to being a possible way of sidestepping the effects of AB-5, registering as an LLC can also help gig workers protect themselves and their assets by limiting their personal liability.  

That said, there’s a chance that creating an LLC alone is not enough to skirt AB-5’s restrictions. The biggest hurdle for these new LLC’s to pass is proving that they are performing work that is different from the hiring entity. For instance, a court can easily find that a freelance writer is doing the usual work of a media company by submitting similar content to what is being published.   

Some media companies have taken more clear cut measures for AB-5 compliance, including not hiring any California-based independent contractors and/or converting contractors to employees.  

LLC formation

Forming an LLC is an easy way to protect one’s assets and limit personal liability. An LLC (or Limited Liability Company) can also be a useful business structure to set up because they tend to have less corporate governance requirements compared to other entities. If you are thinking of forming an LLC as a way to bypass AB-5, it is recommended that you talk to a lawyer.

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CA Assembly Bill 5 update https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/ca-assembly-bill-5-update-926188 Wed, 05 Feb 2020 18:57:12 +0000 https://www.rocketlawyer.com/blog/?p=26188 California’s new bill Assembly Bill 5 (AB-5)  has been in effect for less than a month and it already has had its fair share of legal challenges. AB-5 went into […]

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California’s new bill Assembly Bill 5 (AB-5)  has been in effect for less than a month and it already has had its fair share of legal challenges. AB-5 went into effect on January 1 in an effort to give independent contractors the same protections as full-time employees. There are several occupational exemptions that include doctors, dentists, lawyers, and real estate agents, as well as some professional services exceptions. 


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If you have questions about how AB-5 impacts your business, ask a lawyer.


Recent court rulings

A federal judge ruled in favor of the California Trucking Association (CTA) and granted their request for a temporary injunction to stop AB-5 from being enforced against truck drivers. This ruling follows an emergency restraining order filed by the CTA to stop the law from affecting truck drivers hours before it took effect on January 1, which was granted. Until the lawsuit is completely litigated, AB-5 cannot be applied to truck drivers. 

However, not all truckers support this injunction. It seems that there are two camps: Those who believe AB-5 will protect them from exploitation by larger shipping companies and those who want to remain independent contractors after their monetary investments in their trucks. 

The CTA’s strongest argument against AB-5 is that it is a violation of the Constitution’s supremacy clause. The Federal Aviation Administration Authorization Act of 1994 is the existing federal law regulating the trucking industry that the CTA argues supersedes AB-5. The supremacy clause provides that federal laws supersede conflicting state laws. 

Solutions/Workarounds for CA Assembly Bill 5

While truck drivers may have a temporary reprieve from AB-5, other gig economy companies are ready to challenge the law in their own way. One rideshare company has overhauled nearly all of its California policies affecting riders and drivers alike. California riders will now see a price range instead of a guaranteed price when requesting a trip. One of the new changes for drivers is that they can view all the details of a trip before accepting, and it gives them more freedom to reject rides without being penalized. The implemented changes are to give drivers more freedom and strengthen the rideshare company’s claim that they are not employees.

For a law that is only a month old, AB-5 already has a number of legal challenges to overcome. Several large companies that are dependent on the gig economy are part of a joint lawsuit accusing AB-5 of being unconstitutional. It will take some time before the fate of AB-5 is decided in the courtroom, but even then it may still end up on the ballot in November. 

If you have questions about how AB-5 impacts you as an employer or freelancer, ask a lawyer.

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