After a home buyer secures a loan, the lender will typically protect the loan with either a deed of trust or a mortgage. Both documents place a lien on the house, which allows the lender to sell the property if the borrower can’t meet the terms laid out. But, importantly, when a deed of trust is used, the lender does not have to go through the court system to sell the home.

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Because of this, deeds of trusts can be preferable, especially for smaller, non-traditional lenders. You can read more about the similarities and differences between a mortgage and a deed of trust, but it’s important to know which states allow you to use one or the other. Below, you can find that list.

Note that many states do in fact allow both. Blank cells mean simply that the state does not allow the document in the titled column. 


State 

 

Mortgage allowed

 

Deed of trust allowed 

 
AlabamaYY
Alaska Y
Arizona YY
ArkansasYY
California Y
Colorado Y
ConnecticutY 
DelawareY 
D.C. Y
FloridaY 
Georgia Y
Hawaii Y
Idaho Y
IllinoisY Y
IndianaY 
IowaY 
KansasY 
KentuckyYY
LouisianaY 
Maine  Y
MarylandYY
Massachusetts Y
MichiganYY
Minnesota Y
Mississippi  Y
Missouri Y
Montana YY
Nebraska Y
Nevada Y
New Hampshire Y
New JerseyY 
New Mexico Y
New YorkY 
North Carolina Y
North DakotaY 
OhioY  
OklahomaY 
Oregon Y
PennsylvaniaY 
Rhode Island Y
South CarolinaY 
South DakotaYY
Tennessee Y
Texas Y
Utah Y
VermontY 
Virginia  Y
Washington Y
West Virginia Y
WisconsinY 
Wyoming Y

Get started Start Deed of Trust Answer a few questions. We'll take care of the rest.


Get started Start Deed of Trust Answer a few questions. We'll take care of the rest.