Childcare and elder care

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Childcare and elder care FAQs

Caring for your young and older family members if one of the more difficult challenges in life. Financial help is available and legal agreements can help you better care for your family.

Can I get paid to take care of my parents?

The short answer is yes; however, it may not be simple to obtain compensation and the compensation may be minimal. If you care for your parents in your home or theirs, you may be eligible to receive payment from organizations that would be paying for their care if you were not providing the care yourself.

The following agencies may be able to provide you with some compensation:

  • Medicaid. You may benefit from asking your local Medicaid organization about Medicaid Waivers or other types of compensation.
  • Adult foster care. Some states support adult foster care programs that may help you financially if your parent has moved into your home.
  • Veteran programs. Sometimes a veteran's pension may include an Aid and Attendance benefit that may be used to provide care.
  • Life insurance. Some can pull value from a life insurance policy to help cover the cost of care.
  • State agencies. You'll benefit from researching whether your state provides their own elder care support programs.
  • Long-term care insurance. Some elder persons may have long-term care insurance that can be used to help pay for care.
  • Tax deductions and credits. You may benefit from talking with your attorney about possible tax advantages that may be available to you.
  • Paid Family Leave. You may have this benefit available to you. It allows you to take temporary time off to care for a family member.

Regardless of which agency you contact for support, you'll benefit from keeping meticulous records about the care you are providing. You'll also want to have a signed agreement stating that your parent wants their care from you and that you have a care agreement.

What is the Adult Child Caregiver Exemption?

This Adult Child Caregiver Exemption allows an adult child who cares for their parent in their home the option of receiving their house in exchange for payment. There are two advantages to this agreement. The first is that the value of the house will not affect their Medicaid status. The second is that the adult child will be allowed to be compensated for their care. You may be able to use this exemption after you have been caring for the parent for at least two years.

Since navigating Medicaid and estate laws can be complicated, it is recommended that you work with an attorney who specializes in elder care and medicaid. As with most elder care situations, you'll benefit from keeping detailed records about the care you provide for your parent.

How do I hire a nanny?

Finding the right person to care for your children is not easy. To help you find the right person, it's best to clearly define your needs, budget and expectations. Do not plan on finding the right person immediately. Finding the right person will take time and patience.

Steps to hiring a nanny:

  • Define what you need including hours, how many children need care, transportation needs, extra possible hours and more.
  • Configure your budget and what you can afford based on local average rates.
  • Explore agencies and job boards and post your job description.
  • Write your interview questions and sort candidates. Conduct interviews.
  • Check references and conduct background checks.
  • Make the offer.
  • Require the new nanny to sign a Nanny Agreement. (Agency may provide it).
  • If you are not using an agency, obtain tax information and set up taxes.