You may be arrested by Immigration Customs Enforcement if you are suspected of being an undocumented immigrant. There are several steps you can take in order to petition for your release from Immigration Detention. Read through our informative guide to immigration law in order to understand your rights as an immigrant in the US. You should have your full name, date of birth, and immigration file number on hand. You should also request or acquire documentation of any prior deportation orders, criminal arrests and convictions, and copies of all immigration documents. Make sure you get information that would assist you in your release. This would include proof of ties to your community, family, and employment. Contact information for your home consulate is also very helpful.

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If detained, there are several different methods for requesting release. First, you could be eligible for release on bond, which means you pay a bond amount which is set by ICE or an immigration judge. You may also be eligible for release on recognizance and, if so, won’t have to pay a bond. This normally only happens for people with humanitarian reasons for release, such as a severe medical condition or being the sole caregiver to a young child.

No matter what, you will get a bond hearing in front of an immigration judge. Provide testimony and supporting letters from family members, employers, and community or religious leaders. You also could have a sworn declaration from a sponsor saying that he or she will house you and support you. If you have any past criminal conduct, have a statement explaining that conduct. Copies of your U.S. Birth Certificate or naturalization certificates or permanent residents cards of immediate relatives are also important to present if you have them.

Learn the ins and outs of US immigration law and remember that it's always preferable to consult with an immigration attorney if you are arrested by Immigration Customs.

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