The first thing to do when your child enters the U.S. is make sure that they acquire U.S. citizenship. Any child under 18 years old is automatically a U.S. citizen if he or she lives in the legal and physical custody of the American citizen parent, if they are admitted to the U.S. as an immigrant for lawful permanent residence, and if the adoption is final.  If your child does not meet these requirements, you can apply for a Certificate of Citizenship with Form N-600.

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You also may be required to report the health and status of your child to their home country after the adoption.  Some countries have laws that enforce this up to several years after the adoption.  The country wants to ensure that the child is protected and happy.  Some countries have provisional adoptions.  This means that instead of a post-adoption report, the progress of the child and family  will be monitored before the adoption is finalized.  

You should make sure that you are ready to handle the post-adoption requirements of the country you are adopting from.  Delays with these reports could hamper other U.S. parents trying to adopt in the future.  Also, it may prevent your adoption from being finalized.

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