Non-immigrant visas are for international travelers who are visiting the U.S. temporarily.   There are various types of visas for non-immigrants; for example, there are visas for athletes, business visitors, diplomats and foreign officials, foreign military personnel, media, students, victims of human trafficking, etc.  A comprehensive list of all types of non-immigrant visas are available at the website for the Bureau of Consular Affairs

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Here are the three most commonly known types of non immigrant visas.

Non-immigrant Work Visas

Any foreign citizens wishing to visit the U.S. temporarily for work must apply for a B-1 Business Visitor Visa.  These visas allow foreign nationals to work in the U.S. for a set period of time.  The B-1 is used for short events such as a convention, a conference, or negotiations.  To acquire a B-1 Business Visitor Visa, you will need an employer directly from the United States.

Non-immigrant Student Visas

Any foreign citizens wishing to visit the U.S. for education must apply for an F-1 or M-1 Student Visa.  These visas allow foreign nationals to study in the U.S. for a set period of time.  F-1 specifies visitors who are of academic or language  student status and non-immigrants.  M-1 denotes visitors for vocational education.  When applying for a U.S. student visa, be prepared to provide transcriptions and diplomas from previous institutions.  You must also provide evidence of financial support during your stay.  Interviews are required for those who are 14 through 79 years old.  If you are 13 or younger or 80 or older, you probably will not be required to have an interview.
 
Non-Immigrant Tourist Visas
Any foreign citizens wishing to visit the U.S. for tourism must apply for a B-2 Tourist Visa.  Most foreign nationals are eligible for this kind of visa.  However, visitor visas are not required for citizens of countries that are part of the Visa Waiver Programwho wish to stay in the U.S. for less than 90 days.  For stays longer than 90 days, a visa is required, and the visitor may apply to change his or her status to another non-immigrant visa or adjust his or her status to become a permanent resident, also known as a Green Card.

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