The State of Wyoming is a no-fault divorce state, meaning the court will not assign fault to either party for the divorce. Wyoming uses irreconcilable differences (the two parties no longer get along) as grounds for divorce.

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Residency Requirements

In order to qualify for a divorce in Wyoming, you must live in Wyoming a minimum of sixty days prior to filing for your divorce.

Fill Out your Forms

When filling out your forms, remember that every document you sign should include your name, address, and telephone number. You can check Wyoming's civil court website for packets of documents for your needs here.

Forms to be completed by all parties who are filing for no fault divorce in Wyoming:

  • Vital Statistics Form (leave the "decree section"to be filled out by the clerk when your divorce is final)
  • Complaint for Divorce
  • Summons in a Civil Action
  • Initial Disclosures
  • Notice of Service of Initial Disclosures
  • Affidavit for Divorce Without Appearance of Parties   
  • Decree of Divorce

If the parties have reached an agreement and they do not desire to proceed with a lengthy trial, they can use Rocket Lawyer's easy interview process to complete a Divorce Settlement Agreement. The Divorce Settlement Agreement details the division property, assets, debts and liabilities, and settles matters of child support, custody and visitation.

Additional Forms for Couples with Children:


You may not serve the divorce papers yourself unless your spouse has signed an Acknowledgment and Acceptance of Service Form in front of a notary, and filed it with a clerk.

Make Copies of your Forms

Once you have filled out the appropriate forms, make at least two copies of each. One set will be served to your spouse, one will be filed by the clerk of your district's court, and the last should be kept for your records.

Bring your Completed Forms to your Court Clerk's Office and Pay the Fee


Proceed to your court clerk's office with the originals and copies of your forms. If everything is in order, the clerk will use the original forms and ask you to pay a fee to file, roughly $60.00 to $70.00. You can also ask for a waiver for the fees if you cannot afford to pay them by filing an Affidavit of Indigency and Request for Waiver of Filing Fees and All Fees Associated Therewith, along with an Order on Request for Waiver of Filing Fees and All Fees Associated Therewith.

If your spouse lives in another state or country, make sure to consult a lawyer before filing. 

Get started Visit our Divorce Center Get divorce documents and ask a lawyer your questions.

Get started Visit our Divorce Center Get divorce documents and ask a lawyer your questions.