It’s smart to talk to your doctor about immunizations before traveling overseas so you can minimize your health risks.   It’s especially important to speak to your doctor if you have a compromised immune system, such as if you have diabetes or HIV.  Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should also seek a doctor’s advice, as should parents or guardians of minors, if children will be traveling with you.  Make sure you schedule an appointment with your physician four to six weeks before your trip.

Although vaccinations are generally optional when you travel, if you are travelling to certain sub-Saharan African and tropical South American countries, Yellow Fever vaccinations are required by international health regulations.  There are no other required vaccinations, however; your doctor may advise additional vaccinations depending on your travel plans.  For more information about health advisories across the globe, visit the CDC’s Traveler’s Health Guide.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that those traveling abroad should be vaccinated for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, and poliomyelitis.  Disease distribution maps are available on their website.  Other recommended vaccinations include malaria, Hepatitis A, Typhoid Fever, and rabies.  

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