Once you've become a permanent resident of the U.S., your status as a permanent resident does not expire, but the law requires you to hold a valid Green Card at all times.  Green Cards expire every ten years, unless your Green Card was issued between 1979 and 1988, because green cards issues during those years don't have an expiration date.   The expiration date was developed to keep updated photographs and information on all permanent residents, not unlike a passport or driver’s license.

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If your Green Card is set to expire within six months, you should start the renewal process.  You can renew a Green Card by either filing Form I-90, Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card online or by mail.  It may take up to three to six months to receive your new Green Card and you can call the USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC) at 1-800-375-5283 for an update regarding the status of your application.  While your Green Card application is being processed, you can obtain a temporary proof of residential status.  You can fill out Form I-687 Application for Status as a Temporary Resident Under Section 245A of the INA.

When you bring an application to renew your Green card to the USCIS office, bring an additional photo so a stamped Form I-94 stating your proof of status can be issued to you.  You will receive a letter if your application was denied.  You will not be able to appeal this decision, however, you can submit a motion to reconsider the negative decision.  This motion must have the new facts that you would provide to make sure your case passes.  It must establish that you were denied because of incorrect evidence.  

You can replace your non-expiring Green Card if you meet one of a handful of requirements.

Get started Start Your Affidavit of Support Answer a few questions. We'll take care of the rest.

Get started Start Your Affidavit of Support Answer a few questions. We'll take care of the rest.