The occupational safety and health administration (OSHA) is responsible for worker safety and health protection.

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Employer Responsibilities:


Employers' must:

  • provide a workplace free from recognized hazards and comply with OSHA standards
  • provide training required by OSHA standards
  • keep records of injuries and illnesses
  • provide medical exams when required by OSHA standards and provide workers access to their exposure and medical records
  • not discriminate against workers who exercise their rights under OSHA (Section 11(c))
  • post OSHA citations and abatement verification notices
  • provide and pay for personal protective equipment

 

Inspections:


OSHA conducts inspections without advance notice, except in rare circumstances. Indeed, anyone who tells an employer about an OSHA inspection in advance may receive fines and a jail term.

Violations:

 
OSHA violations fall into four types, each with a distinct penalty.

  • Willful: A willful violation is a violation that the employer intentionally and knowingly commits or a violation that the employer commits with plain indifference to the law. OSHA may levy penalties of up to $70,000 for each willful violation, with a minimum penalty of $5,000.
  • Serious: A serious violation is a violation where death or serious physical harm would likely result from the hazard, and where the employer knew, or should have known, about the hazard. There is a mandatory penalty of up to $7,000 for serious violations.
  • Other-than-Serious: An other-than-serious violation is a violation that has a direct relationship to safety and health, but probably would not cause death or serious physical harm. OSHA may levy a penalty of up to $7,000 for each other-than-serious violation.
  • Repeated: A repeated violation is a violation that is the same or similar to a previous violation. OSHA may levy penalties of up to $70,000 for each repeated violation.

Get started Visit our Employer Center Create documents and ask a lawyer your questions.

Get started Visit our Employer Center Create documents and ask a lawyer your questions.