When you are subject to an OSHA complaint or OSHA complaints, an inspector may call you by telephone. Other times, an inspector will show up at your business unannounced. Your response to both situations should be much the same.

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  1. Listen to the inspector and be polite.  However, it's a good policy to avoid asking questions, admitting to or explaining your side of the story until you've had a chance to investigate. Tell the inspector that you will review the specified allegations when you receive a copy of the inspection letter. Once you receive this letter, you have 5 days to respond to the allegations.
  2. After you receive the letter, post a copy of it on your employee bulletin board per OSHA's instructions. Complete the provided "Certificate of Posting" and fax it back to OSHA immediately.
  3. Review the OSHA standards cited in the letter, investigate the allegations, determine if the allegations are true, and if so, move to correct the hazard.
  4. Draft a reply letter than states the facts about the alleged hazard and the steps you have taken to correct it. Collect and submit supporting documentation. The purpose of this letter is to close the file, so do not give them any reason to pursue the issue further. If your response is adequate, OSHA will generally close the inspection.
If you need more help, it's best to consult a business attorney.

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Get started Visit our Employer Center Create documents and ask a lawyer your questions.